Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

         

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

New Blog

《T.S.艾略特传:不完美的一生》The Imperfect Life of T.S. Eliot

Beijing Inside-Out Art Museum

ts艾略特传.jpg

T.S.艾略特,1948年诺贝尔文学奖得主,他的诗歌已经是公认的杰作,他的批评文章被后人心摹手追至今,他的整个人生,给我们留下太多的启示。

他出身名门望族,在哈佛大学读哲学博士,感到诗的召唤压倒了家族的期许:“文学艺术迫使人抛下他拥有的一切,甚至包括整个家族,而孤身去追随艺术。因为艺术要求人既不属于他的家庭,也不隶属于他的阶层、党派、圈子。他只能纯粹是他自己。“1915年,艾略特决定留在伦敦而不是回到哈佛完成博士论文,几年里只写了些零散地见诸冷门杂志上的诗歌,令他的父母不解又忧虑。父亲1919年去世时,还认为这个小儿子毁了自己的人生。他有过漫长的噩梦般婚姻,做过中学校长,但“教书把整个人掏空了,哪怕连假期也不想写作”,后来做了8年的银行职员,这期间写出了传世的《荒原》,之后做了Faber&Faber出版社总编辑,成了成功的出版商,终其一生兢兢业业对待每日的劳作。

许多年来人们总是引用他早年写过的一句话描述他,“文学上的古典主义者、政治上的保皇派、宗教上的英国国教徒”,哪怕他晚年在公开演讲里澄清这一概括已经极不合宜。作为诗人的他,总是言说那些“不被言说的”,在公众面具保卫之下的孤独里过着隐秘的生活。了解他无论对当时的人,还是对后世的我们,都绝非易事。

牛津大学林德尔·戈登教授以传记写作闻名于世,《T.S.艾略特传》是她的代表作,亦是传记写作的典范。她将艾略特的生平与作品互参,以理解这位精神的求索者所经受的试炼:他的缺陷与怀疑能让一切过着不完美人生的我们找到共鸣。

今天我们怎么读艾略特?而读他如何有益于我们自身?借林德尔·戈登《T.S.艾略特传:不完美的一生》出版之机,我们邀请到中国人民大学教授王家新、诗人王炜和本书译者、青年学者许小凡,与大家一起谈谈这位神秘而伟大的人物,他在记忆与欲望、世俗幸福与更纯净的精神世界间徘徊彷徨的一生,以及他那与人生嵌合为一个整体的写作。


T. S. Eliot was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948 for the poetic masterpieces that won his worldwide critical accolade. His literary criticism has been paragon of the genre and his life has long been great inspiration for all readers of his.


Coming from a prominent New England family, the calling of poetry overcame the expectation of familial obligations for him when he was a doctoral student of philosophy in Harvard: ‘The Arts insist that a man shall dispose of all he has, even of his family tree, and follow artalone. For they demand that a man be not a member of a family or a caste or of a party or of a coterie, but simply and solely himself.’ Eliot puzzled and alarmed his parents by staying in London in 1915 instead of finishing his doctorate at Harvard, and by spending years writing poetry that was published only sporadically and in little-known magazines. His father died in 1919 under the impression that his youngest child had made a mess of his life. He had a long, night marish marriage, worked as a school master yet felt the job ‘took too much out of me’: it made him reluctant to write even during days off. Then he worked for eight years as a bank clerk, and wrote The Waste Land—the timeless masterpiece — during the time. Later he was a successful publisher in Faber & Faber. Throughout his life, he treated each day’s work with utmost industry and care.


For years on end, people have been drawing upon one early description he made of himself, that he is ‘a classicist in literature, royalist in politics, and Anglo-catholic in religion’, despite the fact that towards his later years he revoked the statement in a talk. He often spoke of the ‘unspoken’. In a solitude guarded by public masks he lived a hidden life. It would be unreachable if he had not been a poet with a need to explore and define that life.


Dr. Lyndall Gordon from Oxford University is a world-renowned biographer. She is primarily known by her work The Imperfect Life of T. S. Eliot, which is an exemplar of biographic writing. The aim of this biography was to bring together life and work so as to follow the trials of a searcher whose flaws and doubts can speak to all of us whose lives are imperfect.


How should we approach Eliot in these days? How, then, will his writing benefit us? This event seeks to respond to these questions through a conversation about this great poet. The conversation will be coordinated between Wang Jiaxin, poet and professor in Renmin University of China, Wang Wei the poet, and Xu Xiaofan, lecturer in English literature and translator of the book. The conversation will revolve around the poet’s enigmatic life of mixed memory and desire as well as of the vacillation between his pursuit for worldly happiness and his spiritual yearnings. It also seeks to unravel how for the great poet life and work were reciprocal parts of one design.